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Henry Cheere Chimneypiece – 18142

Important antique George II marble chimneypiece, from the workshop of Sir Henry Cheere

Both frieze panels feature pastoral scenes of rams, ewes and lambs. The centre plaque has a shepherd boy leaning against a tree, cutting bread with a knife as his sheep dog looks up. To the left of the tree there is one resting ram and one grazing ewe.

Above the frieze panels are carved Vitruvian scroll mouldings and a carved cornice shelf. The cornice has a swan-neck pediment, with a scallop shell in the centre of the scrolls.

The coloured marble in the pilasters and frieze panels is breccia violet, of the richest and boldest type.

In the Conway Library, Somerset House, London, an identical plaque is attributed to Sir Henry Cheere. It was bought from M. Harris & Son 1918 and is titled “Shepherd Boy with Sheep”. There are also many Sir Henry Cheere drawings relating to this chimneypiece.

English circa 1750’s

Price on application

Sir Henry Cheere

Sir Henry Cheere was an English-born sculptor of possibly French descent active in the 18th century, particularly in England, in Oxford and Westminster. Cheere was born in Clapham, London, England around 1702, the son of a Huguenot merchant John Cheere (died 1756) and his wife, Sarah (died 1738).

As a sculptor of statues, monuments and chimneypieces, Cheere studied under Robert Harsthorne, the elder and worked along side Henry Scheemakers and Louis François Roubiliac, as well as closely with John Cheere (born 1709, died 1787), his younger brother.

Henry Cheere had a sculptors’ yard located in St. Margaret’s Lane, Westminster and was adept in the media of bronze, lead, marble and stone. Many of his works were rococo in flavour. Cheere was knighted in 1760 and created a baronet in 1766. He retired from business in 1770 and travelled to Italy. A sale of the contents of his yard was held 26 March that year.

Henry Cheere chimneypieces are considered to be the finest and most desirable of all English 18th century chimneypieces. They are extremely rare, feature the finest materials and were produced by the best carvers of the day, under Sir Henry Cheere’s supervision.

 
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Measurements:

Width: 67" (1702mm)

Height: 65" (1651mm)

Depth: 8" (203mm)

Internal Measurements:

Width: 42.5" (1080mm)

Height: 46.5" (1181mm)

Price: £ POA

Product Code: 18142

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Henry Cheere Chimneypiece – 18142

Henry Cheere Chimneypiece – 18142

Product Code: 18142

Important antique George II marble chimneypiece, from the workshop of Sir Henry Cheere

Both frieze panels feature pastoral scenes of rams, ewes and lambs. The centre plaque has a shepherd boy leaning against a tree, cutting bread with a knife as his sheep dog looks up. To the left of the tree there is one resting ram and one grazing ewe.

Above the frieze panels are carved Vitruvian scroll mouldings and a carved cornice shelf. The cornice has a swan-neck pediment, with a scallop shell in the centre of the scrolls.

The coloured marble in the pilasters and frieze panels is breccia violet, of the richest and boldest type.

In the Conway Library, Somerset House, London, an identical plaque is attributed to Sir Henry Cheere. It was bought from M. Harris & Son 1918 and is titled “Shepherd Boy with Sheep”. There are also many Sir Henry Cheere drawings relating to this chimneypiece.

English circa 1750’s

Price on application

Sir Henry Cheere

Sir Henry Cheere was an English-born sculptor of possibly French descent active in the 18th century, particularly in England, in Oxford and Westminster. Cheere was born in Clapham, London, England around 1702, the son of a Huguenot merchant John Cheere (died 1756) and his wife, Sarah (died 1738).

As a sculptor of statues, monuments and chimneypieces, Cheere studied under Robert Harsthorne, the elder and worked along side Henry Scheemakers and Louis François Roubiliac, as well as closely with John Cheere (born 1709, died 1787), his younger brother.

Henry Cheere had a sculptors’ yard located in St. Margaret’s Lane, Westminster and was adept in the media of bronze, lead, marble and stone. Many of his works were rococo in flavour. Cheere was knighted in 1760 and created a baronet in 1766. He retired from business in 1770 and travelled to Italy. A sale of the contents of his yard was held 26 March that year.

Henry Cheere chimneypieces are considered to be the finest and most desirable of all English 18th century chimneypieces. They are extremely rare, feature the finest materials and were produced by the best carvers of the day, under Sir Henry Cheere’s supervision.

 
Make Enquiry